H-1B raids revisited

Computerworld is reporting that USCIS will conduct 25000 H-1B raids up from 5191 last year.

For more details on what the CIS is looking for in these raids please refer to two of my previous blogs.

Two of my clients were “raided” and another one had somebody visit the beneficiary’s job site.

In all these cases the officer did not ask for any documents. They seemed satisfied that the job location site actually existed, and that the beneficiary actually worked there. Beneficiaries were not questioned extensively at all.

According to the Computerworld article the USCIS found “various problems including fraud” in nearly one in five H-1B applications last year.

Yes it is important to combat fraud. But much of the fraud is because the USCIS (as does the DOL) does not accept the reality of workplace situations. In the IT business the end user usually contracts with someone, who then contracts with someone else to get the employee. For instance, Computer consulting Company A has an individual ready to work. Computer Consulting Company A has a contract with Consulting Company B. Consulting Company B has an agreement with say Megacorp C to perform the work. So A contracts the employee to B who then place him at C. The CIS holds that Company A cannot petition for the beneficiary, since Company A will not control the beneficiary and hence is not the proper employer. Company B is.

Why should control of a professional matter? Do professionals with at least a Bachelor’s Degree need control? Why cant the CIS look into the reality of workplace situations?

Instead the Government is using the $500 fraud fee that it collects from Employers filing for H-1b to hire workers who does not understand the complexities of the problem to act as policeman and visit sites.

Also in keeping with this fraud finding, the CIS gives out ridiculous “requests for evidence” (RFE) to small employers. They need everything under the kitchen sink. The Company’s taxes, wage report, pictures, type of toilet tissue they use, coffee maker’s name. I only wish I was kidding.

All this only discourages small businesses, the backbone of the US economy from filing H-1B petitions. Yet look at this year. From April 01 to November 13, only 55,600 applications have been filed. Is this not proof that the marketplace takes care of the filings, and that most employers do not file false petitions?

And lets face it, no small employer can afford just the government fees of $1570/- per H-1B candidate, not to mention attorney’s fees unless they really want the foreign employee. So these employees are NOT taking US jobs, much as the democrats like to think. And true to the democratic principal, there are no more fraud investigations on family based immigration like “paper marriages”, which are far more dangerous than simply not allowing H-1Bs who don’t have contracts with end users not to file.

 

Contact Houston Immigration Lawyer, Annie Banerjee, for more information.

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One Response to “H-1B raids revisited”

  1. Mandy Says:

    You wrote:
    “The CIS holds that Company A cannot petition for the beneficiary, since Company A will not control the beneficiary and hence is not the proper employer. ”

    The CIS is correct. The multiple corporations between the supervisor and employee smells of attemps to desassociate the end client from the illegalities and fraud.

    It’s about time.

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